Kristin Samuelian

Kristin Samuelian

Kristin Samuelian

Associate Professor

British literature and culture of the long nineteenth century, nineteenth-century British novel, materialist approaches to literature.

Kristin Samuelian received her PhD from Boston University in 1992. She is the author of Royal Romances: Sex, Scandal, and Monarchy in Print, 1780-1821 (Palgrave, 2010), The Moving Body and the English Romantic Imaginary (Routledge 2021), essays in Studies in Romanticism, ELH, Nineteenth-Century Contexts, and in several anthologies of essays on Romantic-era literature and culture, and she edited Jane Austen's Emma for Broadview Press. Dr. Samuelian coordinates the Honors Program in English and teaches regularly for the Honors College.

Current Research

My forthcoming book, The Moving Body and the English Romantic Imaginary, explores discourses of national identity, gender, and class in British popular writing about dance, dancing, and dancers, from the mid-eighteenth to the mid-nineteenth century. The expected publication date is May 2021. My next research project will examine representations of depression, anxiety, and related disorders in British fiction of the early to mid-nineteenth century.

Selected Publications

The Moving Body and the English Romantic Imaginary. Routledge, 2021.

Royal Romances: Sex, Scandal, and Monarchy in Print, 1780-1821. Palgrave MacMillan, 2010.

Emma, by Jane Austen.  Edited with an introduction, explanatory notes, and selected contemporary documents. Broadview Press, 2004, 2022 (forthcoming).  A Broadview Literary Texts edition.

“The Politics of Extraction: Blackwood’s and The Imperial.” Using and Abusing Romantic Periodicals: 12 Case Studies from Blackwood’s Edinburgh Magazine. Eds. Nicholas Mason and Tom Mole. Edinburgh UP, 2020.

“Nationalism, restoration, and Romantic ballet: Thackeray, Taglioni, and the good old (English) plan.” Nineteenth-Century Contexts 41.5 (November 2019).

"Dancing in Time and Place: Figuring Englishness in Romantic Periodicals." ELH 83:3 (Fall 2016).

“Periodicals” (coauthored with Mark Schoenfield, Vanderbilt University).  Handbook to Romanticism Studies. Ed Joel Faflak and Julia M. Wright. Oxford: Blackwell Press, 2012. 

“Managing Propriety for the Regency: Jane Austen Reads the Book.” Studies in Romanticism (Summer 2009).

Courses Taught


ENGH 301, The Fields of English
ENGH 305, Dimensions of Writing and Literature
ENGH 333, British Novel of the Eighteenth Century
ENGH 335, Prose and Poetry of the Victorian Period
ENGH 336, British Novel of the Nineteenth Century
ENGH 458, Age of Revolution and Reform (RS) 
ENGH 640, Nineteenth-Century British Literature
ENGH 701, Research in English Studies
HNRS 110, Research Methods
HNRS 122, Reading the Arts
HNRS 130, Conceptions of Self
ENGH 202, Hero and Antihero
ENGH 302, Advanced Composition

 

Recent Presentations

Conference presentations:
“Periodical Elements: The Satirist, Aerial Uprising, and Romantic Theatricality.” North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) Conference, Chicago, IL, August 2019.

“Nationalism, restoration, and Romantic ballet: Thackeray, Taglioni, and the good old (English) plan.” Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) Conference, Dallas, TX, March 2019.

“The Politics and Aesthetics of Extraction: Cultural Interventions in Blackwood’s and The Imperial.” North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) Conference, Providence, RI, June 2018.

“Extracting Enthusiasm: Blackwood’s and The Imperial.” Blackwood’s Bicentenary Conference, Edinburgh, July 2017.

“Bodies Odd and Ancient: Quadrille Dancing, Lady Hamilton, and Unruly Movement.” Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) Conference, Philadelphia, April 2017.

“Figures of national discontent: performing modesty in Mansfield Park and Romantic ballet.” North American Society for the Study of Romanticism (NASSR) Conference, Berkeley, August 2016.

“Rethinking the politics of dance in the post-Revolutionary period: im/mobility in Austen and beyond.” Interdisciplinary Nineteenth-Century Studies Association (INCS) Conference, Atlanta, GA, March/April 2015.

“Signification and the Dancing Body, 1760-1826.” 16th Annual Oxford Dance Symposium, Wolfson College, Oxford, UK, April 2014.

Invited lectures:
“Engaging Ambiguity: Allusion and Intertext in Queen Caroline Prints.” Conference on “Trial by Media: The Queen Caroline Affair.” Yale Law School, New Haven, CT, October 2019.


“Strange disorders: nationalism and disease in Romantic-era writing about dance” Eighteenth/Nineteenth-Century Colloquium, Warren Humanities Center, Vanderbilt University, January 2013.